Fungal Infections

What are fungal infections?

Fungal infections can be devastating infections that develop slower than bacterial infection. Many fungal infections (mycoses) are opportunistic infections. In other words, they are part of the normal flora on the skin, in the gastrointestinal tract or in the airway passages, but a imbalance through treatment with antibiotics or with corticosteroids will overpopulate them and give them a signal to invade and cause disease.

Causes of fungal infections are chronic diseases or conditions such as in patients with AIDS, tuberculosis, leukemia and other illnesses where the immune system is overtaxed or paralyzed. Patients with chronic conditions such as diabetes, kidney failure or extensive burns are all at a high risk for developing fungal infection.

Common fungal infections include:
aspergillosis;
blastomycosis;
cocidioidomycosis;
cryptococchosis;
histoplasmosis;
mycetoma;
paracoccidioidomycosis;
sporotrichosis;
chromomycosis,
phaeohyphomycosis;
mucormycosis; and
yeast infections.